A pension is delayed compensation

A European Union official was sacked for theft and sexual abuse but allowed to keep his pension, a disciplinary report obtained by the Daily Telegraph has revealed.

A second official, who had “a large number of unauthorised absences, systematically refused to work and did not respect the instructions of the hierarchy” was fired in 2020 after leaking documents, the internal report said.

Astonishingly, he too was also allowed to keep his lucrative pension, which is one of the major perks of serving Brussels as an EU civil servant.

So, taking a pension when someone is fired is like asking for their wages back.

Which seems a bit harsh, doesn’t it?

19 thoughts on “A pension is delayed compensation”

  1. Well, yeah… Pensions are basically a savings scheme. And as such any pension rights built up can’t be revoked.

    Mind… The interesting bit is whether or not those individuals are/will be/have been prosecuted and convicted over their actions, because pension reserves can be seized as part of a fine.

    Not sure about being a disruptive bastard and “leaking”, but theft and sexual abuse would definitely go into Round 2 for us ordinary blokes..
    Looks like it doesn’t for high-level bureaucrats.. But nothing new there. Thing of all ages and all places.

  2. Ah, but EU pension schemes are not funded. They’re paid out of current revenue. So there’s no savings element to them whatsoever.

  3. formertory (and lately even more so)

    Seems to me – in my ignorance – that if the pension scheme in question is fully-funded, then there’s an argument against cancelling a member’s rights precisely because it was part of remuneration.

    On the other hand, if it’s a Unicorn Fart pension scheme (like many in the public sector of this country) where future benefits are paid from current income, then it can and possibly should be argued that receipt of future benefits is conditional on not being fired for gross misconduct (or similar). Taxpayers’ money, see, taken under threat of duress. The UK State Ponzi, sorry, Pension Scheme might be regarded differently because there are payments from earned income or what might have been earned income (although here we’re back into taxpayers’ money for public sector).

    They’re public servants! Give them money! (or GC’s)

  4. Asking for wages back doesn’t seem harsh with regard to the guy who hardly ever turned up for work and then couldn’t be arsed to do his job on the odd day that he was there. Interesting that leaking documents was the thing that got him fired rather than just being useless. But then since the EU bureaucracy doesn’t actually produce anything useful anyway I don’t suppose that anyone would care.

  5. I thought some of the EU pensions were forfeit if your brought the institution into disrepute (unusual for a pension but a useful tool to control former employees). Or is the issue that not-working, harassment and fraud wouldn’t reduce the EUs reputation?

  6. Stonyground said:
    “Interesting that leaking documents was the thing that got him fired rather than just being useless. But then since the EU bureaucracy doesn’t actually produce anything useful anyway I don’t suppose that anyone would care.”

    Probably better for the rest of us that he hadn’t worked; does less damage that way.

  7. isp001. Yes, and is likely one of the reasons Nick Clegg has always been careful to never slag off the EU.

    From the workers'(I use the term loosely, obvs) perspective, they had some of their pay taken from them for their pension – what the pension trustees did with it is their problem. Whether the pension fund is ‘fully funded’ or not is irrelevant.

  8. Simple solution, return the pension contributions minus any tax due. Then it’s not the taxpayers’ problem any more.

  9. @John Galt
    I think the Ecksian Solution notes that pensions are paid for life. Then they stop.

    An obvious remedy suggests itself, in a dystopian world.

    Indeed, it’s a little surprising that some Life Insurance/Pension Fund hasn’t been caught ’tilting the balance’, as it were.
    But then again, maybe the last 18 months of Covid….I’ll get the tinfoil.

  10. The EUSSR could have done what English Police forces do when an officer is dismissed the force. A return of all pension contributions, less an administrative fee, is considered appropriate. However, that would mean someone in the EU using what stands in for intelligence.

  11. “…they had some of their pay taken from them for their pension – what the pension trustees did with it is their problem. Whether the pension fund is ‘fully funded’ or not is irrelevant.”

    No they didn’t. They were simply not paid for the pension portion of their salary. The EU current wage bill was thus that much smaller.
    Caveat emptor. You knew what you were getting into when you took the job. It was no secret. There is no reason to protect people from the consequences of their choices. Learn. Governments can renege on their undertakings & and act retrospectively. Other people obey the law. Governments make the law. Only yourself to blame.

  12. Neatly summed up: If you believe politicians & bureaucrats we have a high speed rail line you might be interested in paying for.

  13. When an employee has “a large number of unauthorised absences” and “systematically refused to work” asking for their wages back is probably the right thing to do. In fact, why were they ever paid for work not done?

  14. “A second official, who had “a large number of unauthorised absences, systematically refused to work and did not respect the instructions of the hierarchy” was fired in 2020 after leaking documents . . .”

    Seems like this person could be an anti-EU hero. If the pension is stopped maybe we* should have a whip round.

    * I say “we” as we’re still stuck in. We can’t sell UK made lawnmowers freely within the UK.
    Idle leakers of the hierarchy unite!

  15. “ Indeed, it’s a little surprising that some Life Insurance/Pension Fund hasn’t been caught ’tilting the balance’, as it were.”

    That was a Coronation St plot a number of years ago…sell your house cheap and get to stay in it till you die scheme with the elderly householders then not dropping as quickly as expected so were given some ‘assistance’ by the agent.

    Also there was Tom Sharpe book where a cul-de-sac paying cheap rent is all forced out by the new inheritor of the estate….very funny and devious and led to a few deaths if memory serves

  16. Tom Sharpe book, The Throwback. For my favourite it is a toss up between that one and Vintage Stuff.

  17. @Stonyground:
    Was that the one with the condom, the oven-cleaner and the cheese-grater?
    Maybe it was The Throwback what prompted the thought, though from long ago.
    It must be 30+ years since I read the Tom Sharpes, and that bit still makes my eyes water.

    Throwback, Vintage Stuff and Blott. Ah.
    I also enjoyed the exploding ostriches, and the FBI informers inciting other FBI informers, but that could never happen in real life 🙂
    All the Wilts, meh.

  18. Taking a pension seems unfair and unreasonable because it means that two people who commit the same crimes end up with very different punishments if one is much younger than the other (so one can build up a new pension and the other cannot).

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