I wonder who will misunderstand this?

However, the study authors said problems were also commonplace in younger, previously healthy adults.

The findings showed that 27 per cent of 19 to 29-year-olds and 37 per cent of 30 to 39-year-olds experienced a complication. These figures rise to 54 per cent of 60 to 69-year-olds and to 52 per cent for people in their 80s.

One in eight (13 per cent) of the youngest group, aged 19 to 29, suffered acute complications which meant they were unable to look after themselves after being discharged.

Some will think that’s true. Which it isn’t, not without this qualification:

Half of hospitalised Covid patients develop at least one other serious health complication,

It’s of those hospitalised. And the portion of those infected who are hospitalised in these younger groups is what?

12 thoughts on “I wonder who will misunderstand this?”

  1. Bloke in North Korea (Germany province)

    The denominator trick has been used so frequently in this current unpleasantness (and, to be fair, there are examples from both “sides” of the debate) that you would have thought more people would start seeing through it by now.

  2. Hospitals are dangerous places. It’s a wonder more people don’t die there.
    The NHS gave the worst variety of covid a helping hand by supplying a constant stream of vulnerable victims. No wonder demand for NHS beds fell off a cliff in the epidemic.

  3. I know a few people who have died of Covid ( including two uncles). They all caught it in hospital after going in with unrelated non life threatening complaints.

  4. Bloke in North Dorset

    From the numbers I’ve seen hospital acquired Covid averages around 20% of cases and has been as high as 40% is some areas during the peaks.

  5. “Half of hospitalised Covid patients develop at least one other serious health complication”

    The next question should be to ask if this serious health combination was contributory to them being admitted to hospital.

    In other news 99.9% of people admitted to hospital were found to be unwell or suffering from some medical condition.

  6. From the numbers I’ve seen hospital acquired Covid averages around 20% of cases and has been as high as 40% is some areas during the peaks.

    Some reports put the high level at 70%, though that does sound a bit high even for the nhs.

  7. @AndyF…

    True.

    One wonders what percentage of those “who go on to develop serious health complications” were, as you say, actually originally admitted to hospital because of those conditions, then had the misfortune to catch Covid while in hospital, and thus contribute to the scary numbers.

  8. At our local World-Famous Teaching Hospital I was cautioned not to get out of the lift at floor five (or whatever it was) because that was the Covid ward. I was astonished that it would be easy to stroll out at a dangerous floor. In fact I was appalled that the one lift served both an infectious disease ward and other wards.

    Envy of the World!

  9. So here in Thailand, when you go into hospital it’s customary to have a family member go with to fetch drinks and snacks, help you totter to the loo etc. My wife is currently in with a recurring kidney stones problem accompanied by her niece. On Monday the hospital recommended family members leave because of the risk of covid. My wife is like, “wait, what!?”

  10. It is all bullshit. A bad winter flu lied to the skies. with false positive test scam ramping it up.

  11. How much has a year of inactivity stuck behind a desk in a home office or on the couch watching Netflix on furlough has contributed to poorer overall health leading to worse outcomes?
    I know when I started working from home my step count plummeted vs walking to the bus stop and being in the office

  12. BniC, it is easily worth 100% of people giving up 2 years of life, freedom to travel, freedom to do a lot of things forever, to see their own elderly relatives, so that 0.1% of people get to live an average of a few months longer.

    If you disagree you are literally a murderer.

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