What could, possibly, be the explanation here?

The silvery blue waters of the Great Salt Lake sprawl across the Utah desert, having covered an area nearly the size of Delaware for much of history. For years, though, the largest natural lake west of the Mississippi River has been shrinking. And a drought gripping the American west could make this year the worst yet.

Concentrate on that word “salt” to try to get an idea of what is happening here.

Then think about Lake Bonneville. Then ponder that this is a process that has been going on for perhaps 15,000 years…..

14 thoughts on “What could, possibly, be the explanation here?”

  1. Come on Tim, we all know that anything that happened before man was natural and totally OK. Anything that has happened since man is unnatural and totally NOT OK.
    Even when the same thing occurred before and was FAR worse than what occurred after.

  2. “Because the lake is shallow, about 35ft (11 meters) at its deepest point,”

    Not even bothering to do the math, but an 11 meters deep puddle in a desert is… well…

    Something about rice-paper gnats in biblical environments and chances of survival..

  3. Bloke in North Dorset

    “Come on Tim, we all know that anything that happened before white man was natural and totally OK. Anything that has happened since white man is unnatural and totally NOT OK.
    Even when the same thing occurred before and was FAR worse than what occurred after.”

    FTFY

  4. “for much of history”: which, in Utah, is less than 200 years. “Record temperature in Seattle” they cry. Again, less than 200 years – and if the new record was measured at the airport, lots of bias on the measurement as well.

  5. The odds say you’re likely to get record weather of some classification somewhere every year

  6. . “Record temperature in Seattle” they cry. Again, less than 200 years

    Indeed Seattle dates from 1850-ish. I bet they didn’t have thermometers for quite a while afterwards.
    Although the Great Salt Lake was known long before hand by wypipo it also wasn’t properly surveyed until 1850. It shrinks and grows all the time.

  7. Ignorant person asks: all other things being equal, is the evaporation rate different from salt water or fresh water? I’d guess not (from ignorance) but salt is hydroscopic.

  8. Dennis, Your Guide To The USA

    If you’ve ever been to the Great Salt Lake, and I have, you know that it really can’t evaporate fast enough. It’s in the middle of nowhere, where nowhere is desert, there are no proper beaches, and once you’ve taken your dip the salt dries on your skin… leaving you itchy and uncomfortable.

    You go to the GSL once and jump in once so that once you’ve fled Utah you can tell the local yokels back home that you’ve been there and done that.

  9. I went to Salt Lake City. The empty bits of Utah are interesting but I didn’t get a good idea of SLC on a normal Sunday because it was Pride day with a three-hour parade of people who did not appear to be Latter-Day Saints.
    The Temple grounds, hangout of the actual LDS, was one of the creepiest places I’ve ever been even in the US.

  10. I went to Salt Lake City.

    #metoo. I only saw the airport though.

    Walking through Provo, I was reminded of Sim City: there was a square block of residential, next to a square block of commercial and no doubt another square block of industrial around somewhere. I kept expecting Godzilla to appear.

    The highlight of that trip was being introduced to the Bob and Tom Show on the taxi radio driving to Provo. “White Trash Noise Machine” being part of it.

  11. Not that one, yet, but I’ve walked on Lake Torrens, and on Lake Eyre, …and I’m not a naughty boy!

  12. I can recommend belting down the side of an Aussie salt lake, sun blazing, air con blowing, and Rossini overtures blaring.

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