Abominations unto Nuggan

As I’ve remarked before there are useful comparisons between Nuggan and William Keegan:

Just how long will it take the electors of this benighted country to realise that they have been conned by the Brexiters?

By this I do not mean all the electorate – after all, nearly half those who voted on that fatal June day in 2016 were in favour of remaining in the European Union, and as a proportion of those eligible to vote, the Leave tally was 37%.

Since then, to use a phrase much used by their generation, many older Brexit voters have “dropped off the perch”; meanwhile, the evidence is that the young who have come on to the voting register are predominantly in favour of the EU.

The evidence mounts that Brexit is an almost unmitigated disaster.

Cries of abominations from a mind rather stuck in its groove…..

20 thoughts on “Abominations unto Nuggan”

  1. Entertaining to see he’s whinging about those who didn’t care enough to bother to vote one way or the other.

    Still as he implies, the blessed covid will finally exterminate the ungodly, and benighted Britain will finally return to the benevolent embrace of the promised land.

  2. Bloke in North Dorset

    “ and as a proportion of those eligible to vote, the Leave tally was 37%.”

    And the proportion those voting leave was lower.

    The point about absentions in a referendum is that you are in effect saying you will accept the decision of those who do vote, in which case well over 60% we’re happy to leave the EU. If they weren’t happy they’d have made the effort to vote.

  3. BiND, the sore losers always claim the abstentions as not having voted to leave – or whatever the vote was about. Such is their twisted logic.

    On the subject in hand – we’ve barely closed the door, so it will take time for things to settle down. I knew full well in 2016 that a successful leave vote would result in some disruption while we settled into things. It’s far too soon to bleat about it being a disaster but that doesn’t stop them. And, no, I have no buyer’s regrets. The wailing and gnashing of teeth along with the lamentations of their women is music to the ears.

  4. “meanwhile, the evidence is that the young who have come on to the voting register are predominantly in favour of the EU.”

    The young are naive, and often just answer in the expected way. But do they really care? I don’t think so. The young are eating sushi and listening to K-Pop. They’re more global than the boomers who still think that the world ends at the med.

  5. “The young are naive, and often just answer in the expected way.“

    Indeed. And what does it prove anyway? The young were overwhelmingly in favour of remaining in the EEC back in 1975 too. Then they learned what it meant, and became the Leave voters of 2016 whose deaths Keegan celebrates. In the words of that great sage Hallmark, they’re not old; they’re experienced.

  6. “meanwhile, the evidence is that the young who have come on to the voting register are predominantly in favour of the EU.”

    And the existing young people become old people, and their opinions change. And people are getting old faster than young people are being created. You can see the next line in their argument is to restrict the franchise to those who support their opinion.

  7. He’s gone mental, and his detour into numberwanging why – ACKSHUALLY BIGOTS – Leave didn’t win according to Remainologic is funnier than a tit in a wringer.

    meanwhile, the evidence is that the young who have come on to the voting register are predominantly in favour of the EU.

    Labour and the Lib Dems continue to get their shit pushed in when there’s actual elections, but trust me – the young cool people with their CD Walkmans and their MySpace pages are desperate to rejoin the Common Agricultural Policy.

    They may lead to something that the better-heeled Brexiters did not want, namely a revival of trade union bargaining power.

    Leavers are thick.racist.pricks but also captains of industry.

    However, I don’t think it needed an insane act of making the country poorer in order to improve wages and working conditions

    We’re getting poorer with better pay and conditions.

    the problems employers are having in replacing continental European employees who have, surprise, surprise, got the impression they are not wanted in this country by our so-called home secretary and her colleagues.

    I doubt Pavel or Magda either know or care about Priti Patel, and I noticed that about 6 million (!) applied for the EU settlement scheme, probably not because they were trying to escape Brexit.

    Somebody mentioned here recently that the lockdowns encouraged a lot of EU workers to leave, and that’s undoubtedly true, especially at the lower paid end of the labour market. Why hang around when you’re living several adults to a house, in a foreign country with high costs of living, when your job’s been furloughed and there’s nothing else to do?

  8. William Keegan? Surely Jason King, a few decades on. Incidentally, that has to be a toupee, doesn’t it?

  9. “Incidentally, that has to be a toupee, doesn’t it?”

    I looked and I laughed. If not a syrup, definitely a tint. I was talking (by obligation) with a German shirt lifter last night. Mid 50’s but uniformly black barnet. It was very hard to keep a straight face. Incidentally, the bar we were at was for some reason playing video of the London gay pride march. What a fucking zoo! I am so glad I left.

  10. Bloke in North Dorset

    Indeed. And what does it prove anyway? The young were overwhelmingly in favour of remaining in the EEC back in 1975 too. Then they learned what it meant, and became the Leave voters of 2016 whose deaths Keegan celebrates. In the words of that great sage Hallmark, they’re not old; they’re experienced.

    Guilty as charged, yer ‘onour. In mitigation it was my first vote and Maggie campaigned to remain.

  11. @BiND
    I voted to remain in ’75. But that was the Common Market. Since then, they changed the goal posts so many times, it started with football & ended up as ice hockey

  12. As sir PTerry pointed out, it’s not so much the Ever-increasing Abominations that are the problem…
    It’s the fact that the curtain-twitching sourpusses that see them as “right and proper” have the Ear of the powers-that-be because it’s in their interest, and no-one dares to step up and point out they’re rather quite insane.

  13. How long do you suppose that whining from Brexit’s bad losers can continue for. Will we actually have to wait for them to die before the wailing stops?

  14. BiND,

    “Guilty as charged, yer ‘onour. In mitigation it was my first vote and Maggie campaigned to remain.”

    And in 1975, the EEC, as was, made some sense. Most of the world was communist, we didn’t do much trade with south America or Africa, goods were physical. No-one was running remote factories in China. Almost no-one had a Japanese car. I forget the figure but in the early 90s, there was overwhelming support to remain in the EU.

    Roll forward to 2020 and our food exports are a tiny percentage of total exports. When you’re exporting ARM technology or JCBs, distance doesn’t matter much. And the rest of the world is growing faster than the EU.

  15. Ah, the ’75: the sensible chaps were proved to be wrong and the bloody loonies right. A salutary lesson for me.

  16. “Somebody mentioned here recently that the lockdowns encouraged a lot of EU workers to leave, and that’s undoubtedly true, especially at the lower paid end of the labour market. Why hang around when you’re living several adults to a house, in a foreign country with high costs of living, when your job’s been furloughed and there’s nothing else to do?”

    That would have been me 🙂

    Incidentally, another reason to leave would have been that it would be highly likely that no-one would check up on where you actually were, and your furlough money would get paid straight into your UK bank account no questions asked if you were even still in the country. Ditto child support/benefits/self employed payments. All easily accessible via online banking from the Visegrad bloc. I bet the UK money printing machine paid for a hell of a lot of Eastern Europeans to have a very nice lockdown back home in Poland or Romania. Heck maybe some are still getting the money today, which is why they haven’t come back.

  17. One relevant difference between young and old is that the young value oportunity more, because they expect to be able to avail themselves of opportunities. The old have made life choices which mean they would not be able to make use of many kinds of opportunities, so do not see them as valuable. For example, freedom of movement meant that someone could imagine that they would go to work for a while in Ibiza where they could also have a good time. Older people would be much less likely to imagine this as they would have too many ties – or even they were already retired and had no need of a job.

    @Stonyground – “Will we actually have to wait for them to die before the wailing stops?”

    No. It’ll never stop until you die or Brexit proves to be a massive success. Given the huge difference between what Brexiteers have said about what would happen (“the easiest deal in human history”, “we hold all the cards”, and various statements to the effect that nations would be queueing up to do deals with us), there is nothing yet to convince any Remainers or abstainers that it was the right decision and it very much looks like any success will be a very long time into the future – so long that it may not even be possible to say that it was caused by Brexit.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *