How very reassuring such assurances are #shouldagonefracking

Because of course people always do have emergency meetings about something that will not, cannot, happen:

The government was scrambling on Saturday night to reassure Britons that rising gas prices would not plunge the country into an energy crisis, as ministers held a series of emergency meetings with energy companies and regulators to establish whether the nation could keep the lights and central heating on this winter.

#shouldagonefracking

13 thoughts on “How very reassuring such assurances are #shouldagonefracking”

  1. Average electricity demand for month to date is 28.9GW.
    Installed capacity of wind power is 24.2 GW.
    Average wind power generated this month to date is 2.35GW.

    Anything that delivers at less than 10% of it’s rated capacity for a sustained period is a crisis in the making.

  2. The long term policy change should be to stop the spending on unreliables and put all the money into coal or uranium burners. But we’ve all known this since the Green nonsense started.

    Not of course that I have any objection to fracking as well.

  3. @AndyF

    Windmills can deliver 0% for prolonged periods.

    https://www.newscientist.com/article/2174262-weird-wind-drought-means-britains-turbines-are-at-a-standstill/ (nothing to do with “climate change” of course, which shows how far new “scientist” has fallen). “Climate change” presumably means that there will be no calm high pressure dominated weeks or months in the future.

    Solar panels absolutely guarantee 0% for periods, in these latitudes in December (even the south coast) for 2/3 of the time and even in June/July for a 1/3 of the time.

    @ Decine

    May I suggest “knowingly unworkables”

  4. What ticks me off is the huge number of people claiming the solution to this all is just to build more turbines and abandon gas altogether. With the currently commercial technologies the two go hand in hand – you can never *rely* on wind capacity, so the bigger a chunk of your annual needs you want supplied by wind, the bigger the backup capacity you need, and at present gas is the backup of choice. Geography just doesn’t allow a lot of pumped hydro storage in Britain. Huge battery storage plants – or compressed air plants or national network of electric car batteries funneling back to the grid or hydrogen electrolysis plants or synthetic hydrocarbon production or whatever other technomarvel is presented as the Next Big Thing in storage – are still over the horizon. You can get so far by interconnectors to other countries’ grids, which hopefully have some spare power going (they may have wind when we don’t, or more hydro storage like Norway, or nuclear like France…) and helps even out the fluctuations, but there’s always going to be a need for something domestic too.

  5. Indeed, I see people making use of the current situation as *evidence* we need to scrap gas and build more wind capacity – I think their idea is if you had ten times the capacity we actually needed, it wouldn’t matter if we only got 10% of the power, but to make that work at the scale they need makes the whole proposition barmy. Besides which I’m not sure they’d be a fan of the carbon costs of that much concrete for the foundations covering the entire land and coast with turbines, nor for whatever we use we found for the energy when the blades are all spinning….

  6. Only when the lights go out and people shiver on cold Winters nights will the vast mass of mindless blobs we call ‘the British’ wake up to reality and the climate change lunacy be kicked into touch.

  7. I was watching something in Alaska and a house had a roof covered in solar panels which they said helped with the heating costs….when there’s only 3.5 hours of daylight on the shortest day I’d love to know how that works. Perhaps Not surprisingly they were trying to sell the house to someone from a southern part of the US. They also enthused about how the large windows were great for light. As my wife commented when she worked just below the artic circle one year you don’t really light can creep through the slightest crack or the thickness of curtains required to stop it being a problem until you have to deal with a 20 hours a day of

  8. @MyBurningEars – these people follow the old joke about a shop which makes a loss on each sale but make it up through their huge volume.

  9. @ MBE
    Last month the windmills were down to <1% of rated capacity and earlier this year to 500x demand. Then the eco-loons say that we should all drive electric cars so demand will nearly double …

  10. @John B
    Only when the lights go out and people shiver on cold Winters nights will the vast mass of mindless blobs we call ‘the British’ wake up to reality and the climate change lunacy be kicked into touch.

    1. It seems to me likely that quite of few of them will be dead by then.
    2. Even if they’re not, this current government and their enforcers are not about to tolerate any dissent.

    Buckle up, folks.

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