Interesting

What’s that allegedly doing there?

Protesters rallied outside the Supreme Court in Cyprus on Wednesday as lawyers launched an appeal against a young British woman’s conviction for allegedly lying about being gang raped while on holiday.

Since she’s been convicted why is it an allegation?

Or is this some linguistic thing about appeals that I don’t know about?

5 thoughts on “Interesting”

  1. I don’t know the details of this case. But I would say it is appropriate that, if someone has sufficient grounds for the court to accept an appeal of their case, then reporting should be neutral and not just assume that the outcome will reaffirm the previous conviction.

    Whether that’s true here, or it is just revealing bias of the journalist not wanting to believe a woman would lie about such a thing is a separate discussion

  2. The Mole said:
    “I would say it is appropriate that, if someone has sufficient grounds for the court to accept an appeal of their case, then reporting should be neutral and not just assume that the outcome will reaffirm the previous conviction.”

    True, but this says “conviction for allegedly lying” – whether or not she did actually lie, she definitely has been convicted of lying.

    I’m guessing this is evidence that journalists, as well as not understanding numbers or science, now don’t even understand English.

  3. From memory, I believe the alleged offenders were a group of young Israeli men who were arrested, released on bail, and returned to Israel before the planned end of their holiday. I also understand there is no extradition treaty between Israel and Cyprus. An expat colleague, who spent some time in the Cyprus judicial system told me that, despite numerous allegations, no Israeli citizen was charged with rape, sexual assault, or any other crime during his years there. I hope justice will prevail in this instance.

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