Rather a blow to sustainable cost accounting

Grant Thornton and Patisserie Valerie:

In another case in 2016, nearly three-quarters of the group’s entire annual revenue was received in one payment from a third party company three days before the end of the financial year. The regulator said the size of these receipts at year end should have been questioned but weren’t.

Large cash receipts from traders called Market Pete and Browm [sic] Bread should also have raised red flags but didn’t.

Err, yes. The full glory is here.

Now consider what El Jefe Tuberoso’s insistence is about climate change. That the auditors – these same folks – should examine every company in the country and decide whether it is carbon bankrupt or not. Whether Ryanair is to be declared bust depends upon, say, Grant Thornton’s (they use other auditors, this is just an example) knowledge of synthetic avgas production by Siemens in Abu Dhabi from solar power. Because success in that venture clearly reduces the costs of a company running jet airliners becoming carbon neutral, doesn’t it?

It’s one of those ideas that just isn’t going to fly, isn’t it?

Plus, obviously, there’s that insistence from The Great Tater himself that auditing has to be entirely reformed. You know, we could use auditors if only we reformed auditors so that we could use auditors.

3 thoughts on “Rather a blow to sustainable cost accounting”

  1. …knowledge of synthetic avgas production by Siemens in Abu Dhabi from solar power. Because success in that venture clearly reduces the costs of a company running jet airliners becoming carbon neutral, doesn’t it?

    Well, no. Jet engines don’t run on Avgas (petrol), they use Avtag or Avtur (kerosene/paraffin) – or whatever the current designation is, JP1-5).

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *