Blimey, didn’t know Chris Dillow was this bad

Vicar-in-training Dominic Toms is part of a phenomenon being described as “the Great Resignation” – masses of employees who used the pandemic to reassess their working lives, hand in their notices and seek new pastures.

Some, like Mr Toms, who left a career in the media for a life with the Church, have pursued an entirely new path, while others are taking advantage of a booming jobs market to earn a higher salary.

Toms worked at Investor’s Chronicle with Chris Dillow. Didn’t realise the lad was so oppressive as to drive coworkers into the Church. Can’t be actual belief or anything as the CoE doesn’t do that.

Then again, freelance journalism is one of the few crafts left where a vicar’s stipend is a step up in income.

11 thoughts on “Blimey, didn’t know Chris Dillow was this bad”

  1. I would imagine that freelance journalists have all sorts of side hustles going on given how many of them manage to live in London.

  2. Bloke in North Korea (Germany province)

    It’s generally more rewarding to establish a new religion than join an existing one. The clever ones get money and pussy thrown at them by the faithful. Priests of existing religions have to pay a 90% overhead on the former to the central organization, and steal the latter.

  3. salamander,

    “I would imagine that freelance journalists have all sorts of side hustles going on given how many of them manage to live in London.”

    Have you noticed how many of them are women and gay men nowadays? Also, I suspect a lot of them have various family money.

    (I once asked a female journalist why she didn’t get out of London instead of complaining about how she couldn’t buy a place but the response was pure whargarbl).

  4. “a phenomenon being described as ‘the Great Resignation’”

    Just as WWI used to be the “Great War”. Wait till the jab mandates hit…

  5. I would imagine that freelance journalists have all sorts of side hustles going on given how many of them manage to live in London.

    Yep, something to bear in mind when Boy Jones says MPs should be banned from second jobs.

  6. Tim,
    your comment is fallacious. Individual members of the CoE have actual beliefs (which are noticeably closer to the Gospel than many RC ones) so the failure of the establishment bit of the established church does not preclude individuals choosing to give up a career (some times a lucrative one) to enter the ministry. I’ve known a few who did so, and they clearly did have actual Christian beliefs.

  7. Bloke in North Korea (Germany province)

    John, it’s not fallacious, it’s just cat lick winding up of proddys.

    The proddy wind ups of cat licks are actually true, as I can confirm having once tried and failed to find a Bible in a cat lick church.

  8. I once had a colleague who took a sabbatical leave to “read for holy orders” in the C of E. And then he went off to preach in the wilderness. (Norfolk.)

    Mind you I had a Roman Catholic colleague who told me that he was on the committee that filled his college’s livings. I said “isn’t that odd?” He said that there were already atheists and a Jew on the committee so he felt quite Episcopalian really.

  9. A good friend is a staunch lefty, an even stauncher RC (and a retired geography teacher – does that count as 3 strikes?) He assures me that 60 years ago his parish priest forbade them from reading the bible.

  10. That’s a tad extreme as late as 60 years back but. The whole point of burning Wycliffe was that the Bible shouldn’t even be in the vernacular. For if it were what need the priestly caste to interpret it?

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