How Excellent

In Victorian-era Britain, politics and policy took decades to catch up with the Industrial Revolution. While politicians were focusing on landlords and tenants, the new changemakers were focusing on factories, logistics and workers’ rights. We risk history repeating itself.

My firm’s State of European Tech report, published this week, highlights a maturing ecosystem of experienced talent, repeat entrepreneurs and a healthy pool of investors spinning out great companies at an increasing frequency and magnitude, unlocking massive value.

Good, without government picking losers you’ve got a chance of getting something done then, right?

8 thoughts on “How Excellent”

  1. Tim, I presume that you’ve seen the bin fire on Murphy’s Twitter this morning? An ill advised comment (what else) about COVID and HIV from the P3 and….

  2. Otto Kringdom Brunel

    Yeah but plenty of politicians were investing in the canals and railways and not a few lost their shirts.

    One of the reasons that the IR succeeded so early in Britain was that no one knew how to regulate it. It took a while to gain hold in more interventionist states.

  3. “In Victorian-era Britain, politics and policy took decades to catch up with the Industrial Revolution”

    Are governments so slow that they’re a generation behind? That by the time they notice a thing, have lots of meetings and consultations, the market has already found ways to innovate around it?

    Like the government is something like 15 years behind on the state of transport. They’re constantly talking about new rail lines and more trams, but anyone can see that a lot of people are doing more remote work, not going to the shops, and these two things have punched a large hole in demand.

    Did this happen with Concorde too? Like by the time it was launched, fax machines and better transatlantic lines were appearing and solving problems another way.

  4. Weren’t the government actively promoting fluorescent light bulbs at a time when high intensity LED lights were close to hitting the market?

  5. Weren’t the government actively promoting fluorescent light bulbs at a time when high intensity LED lights were close to hitting the market?

    It was actually the EU mandating this. The morons ( Hilary Benn, Ed Milliband) in Brown’s cabinet just rubber stamped it and failed to tell Parliament that it was an EU directive.

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