Umm, why?

a supposed market in consumer energy in the UK when it is very obvious that this should be under state monopoly control.

Why should retail power supply be a state monopoly?

We can – say – heat our houses using coal, wood, electricity, gas and jumpers. So, the coal merchant, the wood bloke, the gas and ‘leccie supplies and all jumper makers must be the one, single, state company?

Or is this just one of those conclusions based upon nothing but manual manipulation of the rectum?

6 thoughts on “Umm, why?”

  1. The Government are planning to introduce a new energy provider: ‘UKGovEnergy’.
    This will replace all the other energy companies.
    What do you think?
    Do you believe there should only be one energy provider and that it should be run by the government?

    The Government are planning to introduce a new health care provider: ‘NHS’.
    This will replace all the other health care providers.
    What do you think?
    Do you believe there should only be one healthcare provider and that it should be run by the government?

    The Government are planning to introduce a new supermarket chain: ‘UKGovShop’.
    This will replace all the other supermarkets.
    What do you think?
    Do you believe there should only be one supermarket chain and that it should be run by the government?
    If not, why not?

  2. Actually, having coal, wood and gas supplied by the government would make them a lot easier to ban when the time comes.

  3. The Government are planning to introduce a new health care provider: ‘NHS’.
    This will replace all the other health care providers.

    I am old enough to remember pre-NHS days and the health of the nation was not good. The concept of the NHS was good in theory and in practice it brought much-needed medical relief to a huge segment of the population. Where it went wrong – as with all government projects – was that inevitably non-productive bureacrats took control to the detriment of the care-service part of the NHS.

    The introduction of the NHS trusts exacerbated the problem by introducing yet another layer of expensive management. Christopher Brookmyre’s crime novel Quite Ugly One Morning is a somewhat violent, though entertaininglyfictional, account of the scandal of the NHS Trust system.

  4. The birch twigs I collect in my garden when the tree sheds them must – according to Murphy – be sent to HMG who will then return them to me via a long chain of “public sector workers” before I may use them as kindling.

    If only Murphy’s madness were proof that the gods will destroy him …

  5. Ummm… John77 … Birch twigs are Thradhithionally used for other things. Maybe this should be applied to said Elyan Sage first before you use them to light that wholly environmentally detrimental and poisoning and dangerous fire? 😉

  6. I am old enough to remember pre-NHS days and the health of the nation was not good.

    Compared to what? The old will have been those who’d worked during the late Victorian industrial era; the middle aged and young will have suffered through the great depression and war; there were hundreds of thousands of wounded from two world wars; antibiotics barely existed. Wasn’t exactly going to be Shangri-La whatever the ownership status of health provision, was it?

    . . . in practice it brought much-needed medical relief to a huge segment of the population.

    Did it, though? In practice it initially consisted of all those health services that already existed. The first NHS hospital wasn’t built until 1963.

    The concept of the NHS was good in theory . . .

    er . . .

    Where it went wrong – as with all government projects . . .

    All government projects go wrong, but a government project was good in theory.

    . . . inevitably non-productive bureacrats took control . . .

    What, really? A socialist organisation run top-down by government diktat was controlled by bureaucrats? Such a shame that it deviated so from its concept.

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