Carthage, it’s the only solution

Marks & Spencer has changed the name of the favourite childhood sweet Midget Gems to avoid offending people with dwarfism.

The retailer dropped the term midget and has rebranded the sweets Mini Gems after a leading disability studies academic warned it that the word can be “highly problematic”.

Dr Erin Pritchard, a lecturer in Disability and Education at Liverpool Hope University, has condemned the term midget as a form of hate speech which is deeply insulting to people with dwarfism.

Note that we are taxed in order to provide this bird with a berth from which to lecture us all. Carthage, it’s the only solution, isn’t it?

17 thoughts on “Carthage, it’s the only solution”

  1. Surely an opportunity for some pendantry? A midget is a normal person of small stature, not someone with dwarfism. You may remember Robert Downey jr’s Sherlock made this distinction.

  2. I used to have a MG Mid… oh, can’t use that word. I’ll try again.
    I used to have a MG car that looked like an Austin Healey Sprite but with more chrome. Not the “frog eyed” Sprite, the later one. (Can one still say “frog eyed” or is it offensive to somebody with funny eyes? Or frogs?)

  3. Dr Erin Pritchard, a lecturer in Disability and Education at Liverpool Hope University, has condemned the term midget as a form of hate speech which is deeply insulting to people with dwarfism.

    We should only use sensitive, respectful terms, such as “wee bastards”.

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