The people who didn’t hire me for a well paid and successful career should die stabbie, stabbie, deaths!

The real question this raises is what does this mean for a firm that was, for the sake of the record, forty years ago my employer? My suggestion is that the claim, so often made, that there were just ‘bad apples’ in this firm and occasional lapses of quality is ceasing to make any sense now. KPMG has a long list of failings, and is at present not taking government contracts because of doubts about its ethics.

That last point is key. An audit firm is only as good as its ethics. The quality of its opinion making is all that matters, and ethical objectivity is key to that. If KPMG cannot be believed, and I cannot be alone in no longer believing it can be, then there is nothing left for it to do.

That is, I think, the point that has been reached now by KPMG. This firm has failed. No objective regulator could, in my opinion, any longer think it a fit and proper organisation to undertake audits. In that case its licence should be revoked.

Of course, when the government, in the form of the Post Office (note, post office, not Royal Mail) end up jailing people through their hiding of the evidence about a computing system the same doesn’t apply, does it?

13 thoughts on “The people who didn’t hire me for a well paid and successful career should die stabbie, stabbie, deaths!”

  1. That is the problem. Governments, companies, and alas quite ordinary people can all be quite immoral.

    Or of course they can have different views than me——-oooops on what should be deemed moral.

  2. Anyone who has ever had a plumber/builder round knows that however unethical large companies can be, they can’t touch (some) smaller ones. It’s not clear whether replacing KPMG with something else would make things better or worse… As we generally prefer better to worse around here, seems like we might want to get those data first before deciding the best course of action.

  3. “KPMG has a long list of failings, and is at present not taking government contracts because of doubts about its ethics.”

    Whose ethics is he referring to? The governments or KPMGs? The firm I work for has basically decided to not pursue government contracts because governments are awful to work for …

  4. “Should Die Stabbie, Stabbie, Deaths!” Statistically unlikely unless they are young black males in London.

  5. @MF
    “Anyone who has ever had a plumber/builder round knows that however unethical large companies can be, they can’t touch (some) smaller ones.”

    Bollox – because they go out of business (and lose their livelihood) if they continually piss off customers. Unlike governments.

  6. Bloke in North Dorset

    Whose ethics is he referring to? The governments or KPMGs? The firm I work for has basically decided to not pursue government contracts because governments are awful to work for …

    This is what happens when they use government contracts as a social lever. Its so expensive to bid that the cost of losing means its just not worthwhile. The relatively small contract that I was responsible for helping the government to let (£150m and that included the cost of the infrastructure they would be building) had so many hurdles that only one company, the largest, stood a chance. A couple of medium sized ones we thought could do it couldn’t afford the hit if they lost and their investors told them to pull out.

  7. Dennis, Pointing Out The Obvious

    He’s never really managed to get over the fact that KPMG sized him up during his internship and decided it was best to let him explore other employment opportunities.

  8. I was bemused to find that the five-person black-owned company I contracted for needed a modern slavery policy statement to bid for public contracts. Among several other requirements mostly wanting statements that we would not do anything illegal. Because if we were planning to do so, of course we would have put that in our policies.

  9. @Shiney. Never worked much with those lads, have you?

    Incidentally, I’ve got a lovely real estate opportunity for you right here… And a certain minister-in-exile of royal descendant who wants a whisper about…opportunities.

  10. @ Mike Finn
    I make a point of employing local firms/people whenever reasonably possible. They cannot be sure that none of the regulars at their local are friends of friends of mine, so I find that they treat me better than some (too many) council employees.

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