Err, no

Still, this elevation of payroll from a cost to a potential profit generator naturally raised its status inside organisations and began to attract higher-status workers, especially among women, who make up three quarters of the HR workforce.

It’s a way for the skirts “to gain” higher status.

27 thoughts on “Err, no”

  1. I’m too much of a dinosaur to understand how payroll can ever be a potential profit generator (unless combined with the phrase “slashing unnecessary”).

  2. “In an economy like the UK, where productivity growth per hour has risen just 4 per cent in a decade, it is an urgent question.”

    Well no, it isn’t.

    The problem of HR is mostly about massive organisations with plenty of money and how they get overrun with empire builders and parasites. Bloated HR is one of the many forms of bloat. Trying to buy something or arranging travel is also bloated and useless. As they get past a certain size, the parasitism seems to have an exponential effect.

    The HR in smaller companies stick to the knitting. They haven’t wedged themselves into the recruitment process, they aren’t dictating diversity training days. One day, one of those smaller companies will take the place of the bloated company and become the new bloated company. This is IBM->Microsoft->Apple. Apple is now full of women with wanky degrees.

  3. How does payroll generate income? Short of your company being one which handles payroll for other companies?

  4. Could we double productivity by paying fifty percent of employees to stay home and do nothing? Or would it more than double?

    Oh, and I repeat, women in the workplace bugger everything up. Even if they can do the job well on an individual basis.

  5. Agree with BoM4 there

    It is an aspect if Schumpeter’s bureaucratisation of capitalism that the drones start to outweigh the workers.

    A lot of this can also be traced to the triumph of accountants over entrepreneurs in corporations. The obsession with departments billing each other for services meant that often corporations canibalised themselves. Departments that should have been pursuing real customers instead subsisted on internal work, where they accrued non existent company funny money. I used to work in a company where this exact thing happened and the whole apparatus to support this infrastructure collapsed in on itself.
    At one point we were second only to IBM in this market but when the bureaucracy really took hold in the early 1990s, the fate was sealed. It struggled along for another 20 years, but by the time of its demise was a tiny fraction of its earlier mighty size and the world did not notice its disappearence.

  6. I work for an American multinational. HR is getting worse. The company is celebrating pride month, so HR is sending out daily emails on how we can all join in the celebration. Links to LGBT2S++—=***///whatever pod casts, books and videos.

    Since I work from home full time I am able to ignore it. I pity the poor bastards who have to work in the office.

  7. Luckily I avoided all the pride crap at work as it was hardly a thing then. However HR periodically came up with stupid schemes to try to get us to communicate better internally (“FratSor”, shudder!), but had no clue about our lively underground internal Usenet groups that were far more effective.

    Then of course there were the ‘leadership’ courses. One where we stayed at a hotel in Edinburgh making a silly little film. Another where we were ranted at by some guy who was a coach from the sports world and where we got juggling balls…

  8. I recall, soon after I began working life, a colleague telling me that he’d concluded that ISO-9000 (which started life as a British Standard) was really a nefarious british plot to reduce the rest of the world’s business to the state of bureacratic paralysis that comes naturally to the English. Thirty years on the Americans are exacting a terrible revenge.

  9. Ottokring,

    “It is an aspect if Schumpeter’s bureaucratisation of capitalism that the drones start to outweigh the workers.”

    I think a lot of it with when the founders leave large companies. Founders are anti-bullshit people who care about stuff being great and being done, but most of the people under them are bureaucrats who don’t have that mentality. They care about a nice salary and things like social acceptance.

    One thing that can be observed from tech companies is that they can become actively hostile to the workers. Skilled people will just leave rather than have to do corporate bullshit.

  10. “HR as a profit generator”

    10.30 in the morning and I already know that I’m not going to get a bigger full-on belly laugh today.

  11. Daniels, who was named HR Magazine’s “most influential thinker” of 2021, has recounted how in 2020 she posted a 20-minute video discussing workplace racism that marked the end of her being “a well-behaved woman in HR”. She feared her career would suffer. Instead, she has become a highly sought-after workplace consultant and speaker at companies that include Google, Nando’s and Vodafone.
    Her book argued that “systemic racism is the foundation on which our society is built”, and summarised the works of early Enlightenment philosophers John Locke and Thomas Hobbes as being aimed at “keeping wealthy, powerful white men, well, wealthy and powerful”.

    If it wasn’t for those bastard white men, gap-toothed negresses would be colonising Alpha Centauri by now.

    But blaming an African for grifting is like being surprised and outraged that sketchy guys with thick Irish accents did a poor job on your driveway. It’s senior management who are to blame, and it’s not because they’re afraid of Shaneequa. They simply despise their own employees and customers, wokeshit is the dogskin cap they want you to wear in order to humiliate and alienate you. It’s about rubbing your nose in it in the most passive aggressive way. They keep talking about “hate” because they hate you.

  12. ‘Since I work from home full time I am able to ignore it. I pity the poor bastards who have to work in the office.’

    Thank you Salamander. Here I was thinking that working from home was less efficient, and you’re shooting me down in flames!!!

  13. The brilliant Rhoda Klapp

    Oh, and I repeat, women in the workplace bugger everything up. Even if they can do the job well on an individual basis.

    Truths that unfortunately, if said professionally, are likely to lose you your job and pension #15

  14. @ rhoda
    That depends, as always, on the individual.
    Albeit HR often uses their existence to do so (e.g. office with five employees and one toilet is adequate if they are all male but if one is female she has to have a separate toilet so the firm has to spend ££££s building a new toilet or move into a new office block).

  15. John77

    (e.g. office with five employees and one toilet is adequate if they are all male but if one is female she has to have a separate toilet …)

    Ah be fair,I once ran an office that started with three people in it and the first thing I did was to ensure that there were separate male and female WCs. These days I guess we’d have to have a third one, just in case someone went tranny.

  16. “ISO-9000 (which started life as a British Standard)“
    BS5750 popped to mind, remember doing a course on when the place I was working at decided to introduce it, a colleague wondered if BS really did mean British Standard in this case

  17. “Skilled people will just leave rather than have to do corporate bullshit.”

    Ain’t that the truth.

    I was so happy when I was a contractor that I could just ignore all those meetings and “workshops” (Ha!).

  18. Could we double productivity by paying fifty percent of employees to stay home and do nothing? Or would it more than double?

    Ackshually, the way to increase productivity is for government to employ thousands of diversity consultants (who would otherwise be unemployable) at salaries of £50k and up. Because GDP takes their salaries as the equivalent of ‘added value’, productivity will rise – the country will go bust eventually, but productivity will rise. The UK is well advanced along this road.

  19. Bloke in North Dorset

    “In an economy like the UK, where productivity growth per hour has risen just 4 per cent in a decade, it is an urgent question.”

    I have n evidence but my gut feel is that the slowdown in productivity and GDP growth correlates very closely with the feminisation of the work place.

  20. Ottokring said:
    “It is an aspect if Schumpeter’s bureaucratisation of capitalism that the drones start to outweigh the workers.”

    Parkinson demonstrated much the same thing, but much more amusingly.

  21. Tractor Gent said:
    “Then of course there were the ‘leadership’ courses. One where … we got juggling balls…”

    I once had to do one where we were given a collie and told to use it to herd ducks. The Indian(?) sort of duck that waddle upright. Hilarious. Then a big boozy dinner, followed by blindfold Landrover driving first thing the next morning. Utterly pointless, but great fun.

  22. @Ottokring

    Which IBM compitor?

    Toliets: 2 for 3 people – why? Madness. Do you have M & F ones in house?

  23. @ Pcar
    Presumably there were umpteen empty rooms in Ottokring’s office building after the workforce had shrunk to three, so maybe it was a way of using some to justify having a floor to themselves

  24. Funnily enough it was a newly refurbished place, which is how the second bog got there – we even had a shower !( Just one)

    Pcar – no names, no invading Poland.

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