Ain’t nationalisation great?

From John Borgar, who all of us know around here:

On my disgruntled way home I heard the News saying that Mick Lynch claimed he had targeted disruption ahead of the Conservative Party Conference not at the London Marathon – my wife’s reaction is roughly pull the other one it has legs on as those attending the Conference can drive whereas one cannot get to the London Marathon by car. On those (OK few) occasions that I have run the London since moving out of the City I have used a train to get into the metropolis and those living in the north or midlands (let alone Scotland and Wales) need to travel into London on Saturday. Mick Lynch’s spite is hurting thousands of guys and gals who have spent months training pretty hard, some to achieve PBs, more to raise useful money for charities – some will not be able to run at all, thousands will be well below their best after driving a hundred miles or more the previous day straining their leg muscles on overcrowded roads

My response, which didn’t go through (some email problem, sigh) was to point to the joy of nationalised industries.

Which, I think I’m right in saying, the trains really are now. The train companies, the franchises, have been called in haven’t they? At least some of them have at least. Where the OpCo is just taking a percentage of sales as a management fee and DoT is carrying the risks and the losses.

So, who is Mick Lynch stricking against? The taxpayers.

Oh, right, welcome to the joys of nationalised industries.

9 thoughts on “Ain’t nationalisation great?”

  1. One would think that striking against a government owned and operated entity would be akin to treason.
    The people have elected the government. Thus how it runs its serfdoms is what the pople want.
    Thus those striking are striking against the people.
    This needs to be illegal, and transgressions punished in grotesquely unpleasant ways.

  2. “some will not be able to run at all, thousands will be well below their best after driving a hundred miles or more the previous day straining their leg muscles on overcrowded roads”

    What is going on that driving ‘strains leg muscles’?

  3. One would think that striking against a government owned and operated entity would be akin to treason.

    That’s pretty much the case with communist regimes. One of the reasons I hate socialist union cunts like Mick Lynch.

    Can we develop nominative determinism a little more?

  4. Striking (Ho-Ho) that in the years between privatisation and the DfT taking the railways back in house, there were, to my recall, no national rail strikes. Quite a few localised ones for sure, but nothing like we are seeing here.
    The comrades in ASLEF and RMT haven’t changed have they? (is Mick Lynch more militant / further to the left than Bob Crow was)?

    BniC @ 10.58 – Can’t remember who the Transport Minister was (Shapps maybe?), but when this all kicked off he was adamant that it was all a matter for the employers and the unions and ‘nothing to do with me guv’. Lying cunt.

  5. “…thousands will be well below their best after driving a hundred miles or more the previous day straining their leg muscles on overcrowded roads.”

    That’s a bit of a stretch, isn’t it? Some 30 years ago I ran three marathons. At the time I was working as a field service engineer, driving 100 miles or more a day. Driving doesn’t strain leg muscles, not even unfit, couch potato leg muscles, never mind highly trained athletic leg muscles. The man is clutching at straws.

  6. The man is clutching at straws.
    It’s the usual sport thing. Everything must be arranged so the sporting can sport. See the London Marathon. The entire centre of London become a nightmare so they can run round in a circle. You think Londoners like it? And please don’t mention the Olympics.

  7. @ FrankH
    In over a dozen years around the time that you ran three marathons, I ran two dozen and I can well remember that the perceived wisdom at the time included “take it easy for the day or two before the race” as well as carbo-loading the evening before, drinking little and often and “aim for a negative split”. Maybe you know better than all the coaches who were giving advice around the time that you ran, but maybe you don’t.
    I do not know whether you were driving an automatic-gear car but I can assure you that driving a normal one on a traffic-jammed motorway like yesterday’s M25 with continual, near-continuous, changes of gear can strain the left leg even for non-couch-potatoes. Last year I “tore” a ligament in my left leg driving to a “British Masters” race due to some similar traffic, realised I had a problem 400 yards from the start and came an embarrassingly distant last: I needed physiotherapy and have never entered a “British Masters” race since.
    It’s less “clutching at straws”, more “the straw that broke the camel’s back”

  8. “Striking (Ho-Ho) that in the years between privatisation and the DfT taking the railways back in house, there were, to my recall, no national rail strikes. Quite a few localised ones for sure, but nothing like we are seeing here.
    The comrades in ASLEF and RMT haven’t changed have they? (is Mick Lynch more militant / further to the left than Bob Crow was)?”

    Mick Lynch isn’t very bright. Whatever you think of Bob Crow, he did work out how much he could squeeze the government and make money for his members. The problem with Mick Lynch is that he’s still pursuing the same tactics as Bob Crow without grasping that the world is a different place. People can work from home. Disruption of weekend events doesn’t work that well because the roads aren’t that busy, so car or coach travel is an OK substitute at those times. I took a coach to London on a strike day for a gig. Took me an hour longer, but I’ll live with it. I’d rather the RMT lost for that.

    And the thing with that coach is that I was quite impressed. It’s slower, but the National Express coach had nice seats, somewhere to charge my phone. And they’re generally less than half the price of the train. So I might well do it again.

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