Has a certain ring to it

Antonio García Martínez, a former Facebook product manager turned tech commentator, sums up the movement as “a revolt by entrepreneurial capital against the professional-managerial class regime that otherwise everywhere dominates (including and especially large tech companies)”. He adds: “That same PMC (which includes the media) is treating it as an act of lèse-majesté”.

At the heart of this new philosophy is the complaint that professionals are constraining risk taking founders by forcing them to conform to a bureaucratic worldview founded on values that opponents consider “woke”.

Or, as Martinez puts it, Musk is targeting “the entire HR regime, the ESG grifters, the Skittles-hair people with mouse-clicking jobs who think themselves bold social crusaders rather than a parasitic weight around any organization’s neck”.

Yes. Lions. With Lasers.

9 thoughts on “Has a certain ring to it”

  1. Of course, this normally happens externally. You don’t get an Elon moving in and fixing it. Normally someone sets up a rival to the bloated, wasteful zombie of a company and annihilates them that way.

    The only time you normally get this is when the thing is losing money and you get someone who is a bit more entrepreneurial and lean who fixes it (Steve Jobs returning to Apple, Kate Swann at WH Smith). Twitter would have reached this stage at some point but Elon is doing it earlier.

    I read some tweets by one of their developers and they were falling into the classic bloated thing of building their own tech frameworks. Now, developers will always say how it makes things better, but in truth, they just like doing it. It never pays off because you never have the scale internally. It’s like people going to tech conferences. If they added any value, you’d see freelancers who have to pay their own airfares and hotel bills going.

  2. “If they added any value, you’d see freelancers who have to pay their own airfares and hotel bills going.” A compelling point, Mr 4.

  3. “Antonio García Martínez, a former Facebook product manager turned tech commentator, sums up the movement as “a revolt by entrepreneurial capital against the professional-managerial class regime that otherwise everywhere dominates (including and especially large tech companies)”. ”

    I do a fair bit of technology consulting work for resources industry companies here in OZ and I see exactly this at the big guys (e.g. BHP, BP). The corporate bureaucracy and space wasters have taken over these places and money is made in spite of them and certainly not because of them. I was on a town hall call with one of the senior people in tech at a large client and seriously, this guy was nothing more than a corporate politician who engaged in buzzword bingo, didn’t answer anyone’s questions (properly) and left us all feeling stupider than when we started. These people infest middle and upper management at most big firms now.

    BonM4
    “Of course, this normally happens externally. You don’t get an Elon moving in and fixing it. Normally someone sets up a rival to the bloated, wasteful zombie of a company and annihilates them that way.”

    Indeed and it’s often glorious to watch when a bloated wasteful zombie gets eviscerated. This ongoing saga with Twitter is fantastic theatre.

  4. Indeed and it’s often glorious to watch when a bloated wasteful zombie gets eviscerated. This ongoing saga with Twitter is fantastic theatre.

    Hopefully, Facebook/Meta is going to be next, although since there is no point in that Data Theft organization even existing, I’m hoping that they burn it to the ground and salt the earth.

    Preferably with Mark Zuckerberg tied to the roof.

  5. . . . although since there is no point in that Data Theft organization even existing . . .

    Turns out there are a lot of people willing to trade (knowingly or not) something they don’t value highly – their “data”, for something they do value highly – free socially-connected web storage / display. That trade is the point.

    This, of course, doesn’t mean Zuckerberg isn’t a cunt.

  6. Great article.

    Sacks has also been a vocal proponent of the crypto industry and taken aim at the media for its coverage of the market in the aftermath of the dramatic collapse of FTX, an exchange run by major Democrat donor Sam Bankman-Fried.

    In a tweet this week, Sacks wrote: “For years, the elite media has treated every successful tech startup as if it’s a fraud that needs to be exposed.

    “But when the mother of all frauds actually comes along, they minimize and cover for it.”

    Spot on….

  7. @BoM4
    If they added any value, you’d see freelancers who have to pay their own airfares and hotel bills going.

    Freelancers do go to these things. They are the ones setting up the conferences and lecturing in them.

    The value added is to the freelancers.

  8. If they added any value, you’d see freelancers who have to pay their own airfares and hotel bills going.

    Reinforcing BoM4’s point, in the early days of Linux I attended and spoke at several conferences. IIRC the ones I spoke at covered accommodation, but the others were paid for out of my own pocket. It was worth it to me as an independent contractor to meet with potential clients.

    Fast-forward a few years and employers were paying me to go, as a bit of advertising for what we had been working on. A decade or two later and there is no point at all, unless there are particular people there that I need to talk to in person.

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