Follow the logic here

Malnutrition is one of the leading killers of children under five in Africa.

It also affects the physical, mental, cognitive and physiological development of African children and prevents adolescents from reaching their full potential, locking entire populations into vulnerability. It is therefore a human rights issue that extends far beyond the already volatile impact on public health.

Following that logic, the average IQ in Africa is lower because of that childhood malnutrition and stunting.

Not a genetic issue but a real one all the same.

Fun what you can prove when you actually think, isn’t it?

33 thoughts on “Follow the logic here”

  1. Go back in the history of any country you’d find a period when 1 in 5 children were stunted by malnutrition. But they do seem to have had the smarts to work themselves out of that situation.

  2. It was a positive step forward when the African Union’s February summit named 2022 the African Year of Nutrition under the theme of building resilience in nutrition and food security.

    It is a theme I proposed to involve all actors in finding solutions to reinforce nutrition and food security resilience and deliver accelerated human, social and economic capital development.

    Doubt I’ll see many skeletal ‘malnourished’ individuals at that summit (just hazarding a guess of course)

    I’d also be interested to see the full financial statements of every individual involved alongside accounts detailing the amount of overseas aid they have received over say, the past fifty years?

    Of course such a demand is ‘racist’,’imperialist’,’neoliberal’, ‘White supremacist’ etc,etc,etc

  3. Can I write stupid comments and contribute nothing to the debate?

    I think ‘open borders and a Universal basic income will provide the solution here as in so many other places….

  4. If you answer a question. Given a Universal basic income, there will always be people who produce enough to meet the costs of that income. So how do you incentivise people to produce more than the costs to compensate? If you’re receiving a universal basic income why should you do any more?
    Essentially it’s back to the ‘what is money?’ debate we’ve been having over crypto. Your UBI is expressed as money. But money itself is not a tangible. It’s just a token that can be confidently exchanged for goods or services. So the question you need to answer is where do the goods & services come from?

  5. Africa must be the problem because the humans who left it hundreds of thousand years ago are apparently doing better than those who remained or returned.

    Oh, and will a problem affecting one in five really shift the whole bell curve to the left by one SD?

  6. But really. How long ago was this a serious problem in Britain ?

    Just read about the high rejection rate by the Army during the Great War of British youth, not to mention the physical superiority of those from the USA and Empire…

    We today are a race of giants compared to a generation or two back. Ever tried sitting as a six-footer in a Victorian theatre ?

  7. Apologies for feeding the troll there, but I thought it was interesting.
    One end of it’s not much different from Spud’s interminable ramblings. He seems to regard money as a tangible, as by creating it you at the same time create the goods & services it would be exchangeable for. The other end answers the Africa question. Africans seem unable to produce the surplus of goods & services would enable them to to drag themselves up out of the shit. Or if they do, they all end up with the wrong people. Because that’s how you develop, isn’t it? Produce a surplus that is invested in increasing production. Africa’s surpluses just go to making certain fat Africans even fatter.

  8. Malnutrition is one of the leading killers of children under five in Africa.

    Yes, this is why I’m 100% opposed to everything the Guardian supports in its evil, misanthropic, Net Zero little heart.

    Because we don’t want poverty.

  9. Africa lags behind in the slow improvement of people lives but not by as long as many would think. Just two lifetimes ago the age at which children could work underground in UK coal mines was raised to 10.

    By his Mines Act of 1842, Lord Ashley excluded all women and girls and all boys under the age of 10 from underground coal mine employment, in which he had found boys aged 4 or 5 years.

  10. Following that logic, the average IQ in Africa is lower because of that childhood malnutrition and stunting.

    Except the same genes in Baltimore, Detroit and Chicago produce the same low IQ’s and from the looks of them waddling around like beached whales, it doesn’t seem to be a lack of food that is causing the problem, bad food perhaps.

  11. That is a troll in netspeak, PJF Tries to hijack a conversation. Not someone who disagrees with the host.

  12. Can I offer insight even more ludicrous than Richard Murphy and claim that it ‘challenges the paradigm’ and win the debate

    BIS

    You forget that MMT has altered the terms of the debates. There is no impact to unlimited money creation as the bank of England’s paper on money creation no doubt your anger on these threads is driven by some desire to perpetuate neoliberalism and your own privilege but that doesn’t make your insight more valid than mine

  13. Africans have been exposed to the Egyptians, the Greeks and the Romans, and for all I know Babylonians and Persians as well, yet somehow never thought civilization was something worth adopting. Just a thought.

  14. @Roué le Jour – Maybe they think village life, rule by tribal elders and community property are values worth preserving, even if it doesn’t stimulate high IQ (however that is achieved).

    Maybe they are right? Their choice I’d guess as long as they remain in their tribal lands and I don’t have to foot the bill (in taxes, aid or “Charity”)

  15. Van_patten

    I’d also be interested to see the full financial statements of every individual involved alongside accounts detailing the amount of overseas aid they have received over say, the past fifty years?

    South Africa’s president is being investigated because around 20 million USD (numbers vary) was stolen from his couch.

  16. Gunker

    The South Africans I work with laughed out loud at my comment that ‘anyone in South Africa could just mislay $20 million on a farm’ – But it does show a couple of things:

    – Africa is genuinely f%^%ed and I would expect to see around 50% of the populace die – nothing to do with Climate change – everything to do with manifest incompetence and corruption.

    – As Steve often points out from his Moscow residence, with the immigration policy being followed in the UK (encapsulated by the insouciance of Sajid Javid this morning – ‘So what?’) I’d say we might be a decade later.

    I do hope everyone is attending their ‘DEI’ seminars like all good woke folk must do.. That’ll solve the Issue!!

  17. I am sure this is true in some way, but it doesn’t explain the surfeit of stupid fat people we have here. The fatter they are, the denser.

  18. Sorry BC, but it’s scientifically proven that Fatties are actually less dense than people with muscle instead of blubber.

    I think the correct english term would be “vacuous” when it comes to the overfed and stupid.

  19. JG,
    My point really was that we shouldn’t think of Africa as “developing”, nor try to “help” them, they’ve seen civilization and rejected it. They are “undeveloped” and they like it that way.

  20. Anaemia in the pregnant mother caused by malnutrition is a major cause of intellectual stunting of the foetus. Unlike FAS there is little physical stunting. Food programmes for the pregnant mother should be a priority, if they can spare some money from fighting climate change and white supremacy that is.

  21. Roué le Jour,

    To be fair, I don’t think they held a continent wide referendum with the question: do you want to be civilised?

  22. Africa must be the problem because the humans who left it hundreds of thousand years ago are apparently doing better than those who remained or returned.

    The dilemma of “magic dirt” versus “tragic dirt”.

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