Skip to content

And the old will become new again, the first shall become last etc

Martha Gill identifies that women are intelligent enough to learn lessons from the negative experience of (so-called) high-achieving women and avoid following a similar path (“There’s good reason why strong female role models deter other women from aiming for the top”, Comment). She refers to the patriarchal system within which such “successful” women are operating. That surely is the key issue. No less than men, women want to succeed in life. But for many – even most – the definition of what constitutes success is not the same as that proffered within the patriarchal system.

The women’s liberation movement has striven for women to gain access into the male game and identified as successful those women who rise to the top playing by those rules. That was understandable as a beginning, given that a critical first step for women was financial independence. But 50 years on, that is no longer enough for many women. Success defined in narrow patriarchal (usually financial) terms is not something they necessarily consider worth striving for. The game needs to change and so become worth playing. That is today’s challenge for the women’s liberation movement.
Johanna Nixon
Harrow, London

Could come straight from the 1930s – hell the 1830s. The definition of the good life might be different or those who bear and nurture children than it is for those who compete for social status in order to attract those who will bear and nurture their children.

How odd that would be in a mammal species.

That everyone gets to choose, freely, which version of success they’d prefer to chase is called freedom. That the choices differ is reality.

8 thoughts on “And the old will become new again, the first shall become last etc”

  1. But 50 years on […] That is today’s challenge for the women’s liberation movement.

    In the year 3535, there will be feminists sending us radio messages from Alpha Centauri, complaining about how they’re still not “liberated” yet.

    Because True Feminism will never be tried.

  2. This is the problem with those obsessed with imposing societal change. Different people want different things, and the imposers refuse to accept that.

  3. ‘That everyone gets to choose, freely, which version of success they’d prefer to chase is called freedom. That the choices differ is reality.’

    How right you are Tim.

  4. The Meissen Bison

    The sad aspect of this progress is that feminists succeeded in storming the citadels of men only institutions and clubs and now they bleat for women-only spaces. In the past, if a woman was importunated by a man in an underground train, for example, other men in the carriage would have intervened more or less forcibly. That no longer holds.

  5. True, TMB. I’m so old I remember that women always sat at the front of the tram. (We don’t have trams in Brissie anymore, naturally.)

    Now in buses or trains, they sometimes have to put up with my loathsome presence.

  6. “But 50 years on”: ignorant twat. Perhaps she’s never heard of the The Sex Disqualification (Removal) Act 1919; maybe that’s because her feminism is just another seedy import from the USA.

  7. It’s worse.

    Previous generations of feminists have reduced freedom for the current generation.

    All those double income families have put the price of housing up so much that going to work is no longer a choice for many women, it’s a necessity.

    And they’ll say that it’s the “patriarchy’s” fault!

  8. The Paradox of Declining Female Happiness

    Abstract
    By many objective measures the lives of women in the United States have improved over the past 35 years, yet we show that measures of subjective well-being indicate that women’s happiness has declined both absolutely and relative to men. The paradox of women’s declining relative well-being is found across various datasets, measures of subjective well-being, and is pervasive across demographic groups and industrialized countries. Relative declines in female happiness have eroded a gender gap in happiness in which women in the 1970s typically reported higher subjective well-being than did men. These declines have continued and a new gender gap is emerging – one with higher subjective well-being for men.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *