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So let’s go wipe out the beavers again, eh?

Aggressive, disease-spreading mosquitoes could plague London every summer by the middle of this century, researchers have warned.

According to a preprint from modellers in the UK, US and Israel, Britain’s capital city will become hospitable for Aedes aegypti – the “yellow fever mosquito” – sooner than thought. The blood-sucking insects also carry diseases including dengue, Zika and chikungunya.

The new research takes into account natural variability in climate – as well as human-driven warming – for the first time, and predicts that the insects will establish themselves in London for between one and four months a year by 2060, and up to five months by the end of the century.

There is a reason we went and drained all those swamps. They killed people. Somerset Levels were notorious for killing agues. But of course it’s now government policy that they all be returned to mosquito breeding grounds.

19 thoughts on “So let’s go wipe out the beavers again, eh?”

  1. Aggressive, disease-spreading mosquitoes could plague London every summer by the middle of this century, researchers have warned.

    Good, it’ll make the locals feel at home.

    Let them eat Tsetse.

  2. I can recommend the method adopted by Campbell-Newman – lots and lots of insecticide.

    Since not much DDT is used these days, it would probably be the most effective choice.

  3. My father’s ancient farmhouse was plagued with cockroaches and my mother refused to move in until they were dealt with. The whole place was DDT-blasted and it got rid of all of them forever. Brilliant stuff. I don’t think I’d seen a cockroach until I moved to the orient.

  4. See also the time and effort spent in building river drains, and straightening, dredging and clearing natural waterways, all of which was then knackered by the EU cutting funding if your waterways weren’t “natural” and so causing massive flooding

  5. It should be remembered that these doomsday predictions never actually happen.

    Oh, the mosquitos will settle. the tiger mosquito is already established in the mediterranean, and gets up as far as middle Clogland in the summer, so the south of England is..well… easy..
    As the beasties did in the Roman Warm, and the Medieval Warm..
    Same method of introduction, even: trade….

    Whether the Scary Diseases will come to pass en masse… I doubt it.
    I’d have to look up the lifecycle for each and every one of those diseases/parasites, but if there’s intermediates it may well be they can’t propagate because lack of intermediate hosts.

    Second.. There’s modern medicine that knows how to deal with most of that stuff. May get individual cases, but not massive outbreaks like the days of yore.
    Well… except in the Culturally Enriched areas, but that’d be just another highlight of an ongoing issue, really.

  6. “modern medicine that knows how to deal with most of that stuff. ”

    Maybe; yet it didn’t know how to deal with a bad cold from China.

  7. BiP: Maybe; yet it didn’t know how to deal with a bad cold from China

    Oh the medicine was there all right (and not so desperately modern either) but it was proscribed and not prescribed.

  8. TMB, you forgot the bit where the Politicians ignored/forgot the Science.

    Honestly… I’ve posted, from the Teat, what WuFlu was and was not, linking and quoting actual scientific articles that were publicly available, becuz covid scare.
    The ban on Paywalling stuff did make thing readily available…

    It’s useless, even here.

  9. @Grikath, September 21, 2023 at 11:31 pm

    +1

    ~24 Feb 2020 After perusing mortality data, I posted here:

    Nothingburger, like Flu – Keep Calm and Carry On As Normal

    Diamond Princess cconfirmed

  10. Yellow Fever, Malaria etc are herd diseases. You can have ten million bloodsucking mosquitoes swarming around and if none of the humans they draw blood from and reinject have the herd disease, not a problem. Frog zample Finland in summer has more mosquitoes than grains of sand and an incidence of tropical diseases approaching zero.

    As a matter of interest according to John and Mary Gribbin, James I of England likely died of malaria back in 1625.

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