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Typical doctors

Medics treating critically ill babies are quitting their jobs owing to “considerable moral distress” caused by a rightwing Christian group behind a series of end-of-life court cases, the Guardian has been told.

Senior doctors claimed the behaviour of some evangelical campaigners was “prolonging the suffering” of seriously ill infants. They accused them of “selling falsehoods and lies” to families and of using legal tactics condemned by judges.
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He said: “These groups are complicit in prolonging suffering and not allowing for a good death, which makes someone’s death longer and more painful than it needs to be. That’s what keeps us awake at night.”

How dare anyone disagree with my estimation of someone else’s life?

This is how we got eugenics of course…..

13 thoughts on “Typical doctors”

  1. When you see a medical team doing resuscitation, repeatedly breaking your gran’s ribs and jolting her with high voltage shocks, maybe you would think differently… And this was after they were shown her signed statement that she did not want such treatment. Whatever you put in your power of attorney, these guys will do anything to keep you alive. Probably something to do with lawyers and judges

  2. Whatever you put in your power of attorney, these guys will do anything to keep you alive

    Unless you want your child to leave the country for some experimental treatment in a last ditch effort to prolong their life, then these same guys will do anything to make sure you die. Probably something to do with lawyers and judges.

  3. “Unless you want your child to leave the country for some experimental treatment in a last ditch effort to prolong their life, then these same guys will do anything to make sure you die. Probably something to do with lawyers and judges.”

    No, more about noses put out of joint, and not wanting to be made to look stupid. After all if our NHS doc says ‘This kid is toast, it needs to die in an NHS hospital’ and the parents take it abroad where another doc proceeds to keep it alive or (heaven forbid) cure it, that wouldn’t paint our ‘NHS hero’ in a very good light would it? So far better to use the law to make sure the kid dies under the NHS’s tender care…….a nice little self fulfilling prophecy – look I told you he was terminally ill, and now he’s died, so I was right.

    Its not the law wanting these kids not to be taken abroad, its the evil NHS f*ckers who don’t want to be made to look stupid, or have their authority questioned.

  4. @Jim

    “Its not the law wanting these kids not to be taken abroad, its the evil NHS f*ckers who don’t want to be made to look stupid, or have their authority questioned.”

    I am guessing that the judges are implementing some law or another. Some court order is used with some authority that bars the parents from taking the patient elsewhere. I’m guessing that there is some sort of “law on the books” that allows this ruling to be enforced.

    So there is some de facto or de jure law here ? (Not from the UK, so I don’t know the specific statutes)

  5. Speaking as a Doctor I can confirm many of my colleagues are @@nts of the highest order and will never leave an overpaid job.

  6. Wife worked ICU/Critical Care for decades and having seen and done resuscitation has given me very strict instructions concerning Do Not Resuscitate

  7. “I am guessing that the judges are implementing some law or another. Some court order is used with some authority that bars the parents from taking the patient elsewhere. I’m guessing that there is some sort of “law on the books” that allows this ruling to be enforced.”

    Yes, but only because the NHS goes to court to enforce it. They could just say to parents ‘Yes of course, if you’ve got an alternative treatment in mind, feel free’. Instead they act like concentration camp guards.

  8. Note the linguistic sleight of hand at the start: “Medics treating critically ill babies are quitting their jobs” – not “some medics”, which would be more accurate. See this constantly re: global warming.

  9. Unless you want your child to leave the country for some experimental treatment in a last ditch effort to prolong their life, then these same guys will do anything to make sure you die. Probably something to do with lawyers and judges.

    A lot of this stems from the Ashya King case where NHS docs went to great lengths to attempt to prevent his parents from accessing the Proton Beam therapy that would save his life, which was not available in the UK.

    They fled the country and were subject to an International Arrest Warrant and attempts at extradition from Spain until it was finally agreed to allow the child to have the treatment in Prague.

    Despite having some remaining after-effects he’s alive to this day, against the assurances of NHS doctors in court that he was all but a goner and that the treatment wouldn’t help.

    It’s this sort of situation that they are trying to prevent recurring when the seek injunctions preventing parents from leaving the UK with sick children.

    Finally, family of little Ashya win the fight to fly him to Prague for proton beam therapy which could save his life

  10. Stop providing ‘free’ health care.

    Privatise health care then people can pay for their own estimations of life, rather than others having to pick up the bill.

    It’s easy to have ‘estimations’ when others are paying.

  11. Some of my best friends

    Despite having some remaining after-effects he’s alive to this day, against the assurances of NHS doctors in court that he was all but a goner and that the treatment wouldn’t help.

    Cobblers. The tumour had been completely removed: the disagreement was about follow-up treatment to reduce the chance of recurrence. To quote the judge: ” the hospital advised that patients like Ashya with completely resected classical medulloblastomas have a 70-80% chance of surviving five years and that, although survival rates at ten years were slightly lower, if the patient survived to ten years, they
    would be considered cured.”

    For post-surgical treatment, it was agreed that chemotherapy and radiotherapy should be used to reduce the likelihood of recurrence. Because cancer cells can spread via cerebrospinal fluid, it would be necessary to irradiate the whole of the brain and spine. Inevitably, some damage to Ashya’s brain would result.

    Ashya’s parents wanted to use proton-beam radiotherapy, which can be more precisely targeted. The NHS doctors saw little benefit to this, since it would be necessary to irradiate the whole brain either way, and wanted to get on with the treatment,

    In the end, Ashya was treated with proton-beam radiotherapy in Prague, the treatment plan having been agreed by doctors at both hospitals.

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