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Do bugger off love

Sometimes a conversation on a vital topic can be the hardest one to have. The publication of the Misogyny in Music report by the women and equalities committee has opened such an important conversation.

We might predict that the word problematic will turn up. Not that I’m going to read any more to find out.

Boilerplate trash.

17 thoughts on “Do bugger off love”

  1. Expect, Otto, it seems they have: ’Gemma Cairney is an author and broadcaster who has presented on BBC Radio 2 and 6 Music.’

    Got to say, as an avid listener of R2, I’d not heard of her.

  2. Based on evidence from women across the industry – including academics, festival representatives, record-label executives and artists – it concluded that the music industry is a “boys’ club” in which women, especially Black women, face endemic discrimination, bullying and sexual harassment.

    C’mere.

  3. If you asked anyone of they thought their talents were underappreciated the response would be Yes 99% of the time.
    But they only asked women.

  4. Found her on the BBC website

    Gemma Cairney is the new voice of Radio 1’s Early Breakfast show (Monday to Friday 4am to 630am), waking listeners up with a show full of music, fashion and showbiz gossip.

    This was quite a while ago. I am on my tablet and cannot see the source to glean a date. Some (white) chap called Chris Howard has the gig now.

  5. Its never been easier to break into the music biz. You can record in your bedroom, publicise yourself for free on social media, make your music available to the masses via youtube etc. So if there’s loads of talented women out there whose wonderful music is being hidden by the nasty men in the record industry (who as far as I can see just want to make money and would promote wall to wall one eyed black lesbian musicians if there was some $$$ in it). So why aren’t they doing that?

    Its just another example of women sticking their hands out and saying ‘Give us money for doing nothing’.

  6. I have a neighbour who works for one of the big labels. Her specific job is to nurture new female talent ( she makes a point if it being “of any age” ) and help them get a foot in the door.

  7. There was some thesp luvvy on Today this morning (I didn’t catch his name) who complained bitterly about public underfunding of the (globally important) British London theaterati. Summarising, his complaint was that he and his mates are not getting enough of the money that the Government confiscates from the people who actually earned it.

    Well, Sunshine, put on shows that make a profit, rather than pandering to the global echo chamber who tell you how wonderful you are.

  8. To quote Kevin Spacey from the film ‘A Time To Kill’

    ‘And it ain’t even my birthday’

    The publication of the Misogyny in Music report by the women and equalities committee has opened such an important conversation. Based on evidence from women across the industry – including academics, festival representatives, record-label executives and artists – it concluded that the music industry is a “boys’ club” in which women, especially Black women, face endemic discrimination, bullying and sexual harassment. For me, its findings hit home.

    Sounds like a highly impartial body whose authorship doesn’t carry any agenda whatsoever. But why, oh why did these findings hit home so hard?

    The report was published within days of the closure of two independent production companies that were owned and run by Black women: Boom Shakalaka, which I founded in 2015, and Broccoli Productions, founded by Renay Richardson. Do these closures, as some have suggested, signify deep problems within the creative industries, stemming from misogyny and misogynoir (prejudice against Black women), and a wider lack of fairness?

    The gravy train, paid for under threat of incarceration by a taxpayer body which is 86% ‘racist white’ has come to a halt.

    Postcolonial fallout is written into the DNA of so much of the way the UK works: this is especially evident in sectors producing popular culture. From the moment you walk into the buildings where some of the biggest creative ideas are incubated, you notice the lesser-paid and manual labour jobs, from reception to cleaning staff, being done by people of colour. Meanwhile, the top-tier bosses – those who get the final say on how to distribute the funds that make content happen – are so often white and male.

    And most adverts and shows feature almost exclusively non-White performers (or a ratio far outside the overall makeup of the population) – most ethnic minorities will automatically be favoured in applications by the BBC even if they’re blatantly incapable. What I would observe is that the prime beneficiaries of political correctness are arguably White women – maybe she’s attacking the wrong group – but to state that would be ‘supporting the patriarchy’ or some other faux pas.

    At Boom Shakalaka we found the hoop-jumping and box-ticking of commissioning processes, funding and awards exhausting. We grew frustrated by the unwillingness to invest the money it takes to make a truly diverse industry. So much of our time was spent working out complex systems or the random protocol of putting ideas forward to different networks and platforms, navigating a matrix of gatekeepers and relentlessly adapting pitches to suit them. Feedback sometimes felt patronising, then would come the chasing and nudging on emails, sometimes not to hear anything back at all.

    Far better that we just got the moolah without any process being involved at all – aren’t we entitled to something as a result of slavery even though we were born 100 plus years after it was outlawed?

    We worked hard to adapt our approach, recruiting diverse talent that reflected the broader lived experience in the stories we told, we worked with production teams of all socioeconomic backgrounds, but it still felt like we were smiling in the face of a rigid patriarchy.

    I remember well seeing your adverts all over the North East and North West recruiting for people from those regions

    I have to admit, I’m tired. Tired and hot with rage that policies for higher standards of safety and inclusion in these industries are only being talked about now, when the problems have been well known for decades. Anyone remember when Black women were represented on mainstream TV by the caricatures on Bo’ Selecta (2002-2009) and Come Fly With Me (2010)? How did that get signed off? By having the same people still in charge of the industry.

    It’s telling she has to go back 14 years to find examples – I cannot honestly recall a single negative representation of a black female in a mainstream drama over the last decade – one reason I seldom watch them. If a ‘girlboss’ is uninteresting then a black ‘girlboss’ really is visual Mogadon. As for ‘inclusion’ policies – this seems to translate to – my ideas should always get picked up on account of my race and (to a lesser extent) gender.

    Narratives and genre categories should also be completely reworked. Why are so many Black female presenters on BBC Radio networks on 1Xtra, for example?

    I’d say most license fee payers would be asking a more basic question is ‘why are there so many black female presenters’ when they constitute such a small part of the population? Indeed I’d recommend she listen to the famous Bachman Turner Overdrive tune as she may want to bear the lyrics in mind when the backlash against her relentless grift comes it ain’t going to be pleasant

    It is due to these lack of opportunities in broadcast and production that I have pivoted my career more into arts, culture and writing. But just last year I was invited into the office of an arts venue owner only to have cigarette smoke blown in my face and to be shown bizarre visual works of his that included disturbing pornographic imagery of Black women. Although these days I have a thick skin, and have done so much to work through the medley of effects of trauma of this ilk, it still had me in tears for days.

    People still smoke in their office?? She’s also had far more opportunities than any white male heterosexual equivalent would have had with similarly minimal talent.

    I believe how we treat women, the trans community and BPOC (Black people, and people of colour) and migrant talent in the public eye, and how we get to tell our stories in the media, affect how we all treat each other in our everyday society. So it’s time the creative industries stopped being a “boys’ club” and started to represent all their employees and audiences fairly. It’s a conversation that is overdue, painful and essential so that we don’t miss out on the UK’s creative potential – and it should start right here.

    I’d agree with this – the relentless favouritism across all sectors of the economy being shown to women, the trans community and BPOC who get preferential treatment in every aspect of hiring, treatment by the law , and favourable access to housing is building a horrendous backlash. The realization that the game is rigged will (and already is) leading to a buildup of real hatred for those responsible for it.

    A truly fascinating expose of the ‘eternal victim’ mindset. Will be interesting to see how she handles it when Hamas/ ISIS put her into a Burqa for sure.

  9. When I was at university I had a show on the university radio station.

    The show was titled Wey Hey It’s Monday! It went out on Tuesday morning in the coveted 2am to 6am slot.

  10. She does realise that black people are only 4% of the population, doesn’t she? Exactly how many does she expect to see in the media?

    Ah, clearly, she doesn’t. Move along, STFU.

  11. So she, as a BPOC, had an independent production company that failed, and everywhere she went she saw white men at the helm of rich, successful, still solvent companies. Hmmmmm, maybe she’s just crap and it’s nothing to do with colour. Hence the switch to grifting for free cash.

  12. Radio 1’s Early Breakfast show (Monday to Friday 4am to 630am), waking listeners up with a show full of music, fashion and showbiz gossip.
    So R1 doesn’t even try to be relevant? If it was sending it’s listeners to bed at those hours, maybe.

  13. I’m inclined to think IYDLIFO applies here. If you don’t like the boy’s club, start your own and tap into the unsatisfied desire for black gay trans woman artists by the white straight musical audience.

  14. Jgh, back in my day, 2am was the time students started talking absolute sh1t about the origins of the universe and the merits of Marxism-Leninism before flaking our drunk, so I expect your audience would be in the tens.

  15. “Its just another example of women sticking their hands out and saying ‘Give us money for doing nothing’.”

    Well, Jim, she certainly works for the right organisation to do that. It’s their modus operandi, after all…

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