Skip to content

Slightly dangerous, no?

The far-Right Alternative for Germany (AfD) party scored a rare political victory in Saxony after a Leftist opposition councillor announced he was “going for a joint” and missed a vote.

Dresden city council debated a motion on Friday calling for asylum seekers to be given payment cards rather than cash to buy food and supplies.

The proposal had been put forward by the AfD, which Germany’s intelligence service has officially designated a Right-wing extremist party in the state of Saxony.

Sure, the purpose of the intelligence lot is to collect intelligence and warn on hte basis of that. But, umm, the bureau of the esbalishment gets to define what is an allowable set of political policies?

Hmm.

17 thoughts on “Slightly dangerous, no?”

  1. Gott in Himmel! Nun, ich bin vier Rechts, also!

    I failed German O level 54 years ago, so the above may be somewhat Garbageful. Couldn’t be arsed to use Google Translate…

  2. I understand we miserable rightists introduced a somewhat similar reform in the Northern Territory.

    The poor old abos were given a card rather than cash to pay for their tucker. Thus meanly making sure they couldn’t spend the dosh on grog instead.

  3. Bloke in North Dorset

    I think we’d rather Germany avoided right wing ( and left wing extremism) and there are plenty of protections. This is Wik, but looking it looks like a reasonable summary:

    Overview
    The BfV is overseen by the Federal Ministry of the Interior as well as the Bundestag, the Federal Commissioner for Data Protection and Freedom of Information and other federal institutions. The Federal Minister of the Interior has administrative and functional control of the BfV. Parliamentary control is exercised by the Bundestag in general debate, question times and urgent inquires, as well as by its committees, most notably the Parliamentary Oversight Panel and the G 10 Commission [de]. The BfV is also under judicial control and all its activities can be legally challenged in court. Based on the right of information, the general public can direct inquiries and petitions at the BfV.[5]

    Unlike some intelligence agencies of other countries, the agents of the German intelligence services, including the BfV, have no police authority. This is due to the history of abusive police power in previous regimes. In particular, they are not allowed to arrest people and do not carry weapons.[citation needed]

    That last citation needed can be found here: https://www.bmi.bund.de/EN/topics/security/protection-of-the-constitution/protection-of-the-constitution.html

    The biggest worry is the firewall of other parties not working with the AfD , which is also happening in other countries with so called right wing parties. That in itself is already attracting voters to the AfD and getting them some sympathy.

    This is a good read in to the background of what’s happening and why that firewall is so dangerous.

    https://www.tabletmag.com/sections/news/articles/germany-far-right-stopped-afd-jeremy-stern

  4. I think we’d rather Germany avoided right wing ( and left wing extremism)

    I don’t know about that. Given the way Europe is heading maybe we could do with some good old German right wing extremism…

    *Puts up flameshield and runs for cover*

  5. “think we’d rather Germany avoided right wing ( and left wing extremism) ”

    Bit late now.

    The establishment parties have so buggered the country that even people in sensible places are looking for alternatives.

    The nutter vote will now be split between the Afd and BSW, which will be a relief for the CDU but will still condemn the Socialists to fourth place or below.

    The German media is full of the right wing threat and demonstrations against them by ordinary Burgers. Naturally they are trying to link this with a rise in anti semitism.

    No one believes them.

  6. BiND – I think we’d rather Germany avoided right wing ( and left wing extremism)

    I would have rather Germany avoided demographic and economic death, but their political establishment has chosen both.

    Not sure what they think they’re going to do with a country full of Muslims and no jobs, but it’s probably not gonna be a great laugh for anybody living in the formerly German country of Germany.

    But the point of Kagan’s article was not to paint a precise picture of what was happening in Germany; it was to use Germany as an object lesson in what you get when voters deviate too much from the traditional preferences of the U.S. foreign policy establishment.

    Oy veh, innit.

    A week later, Walter Lübcke, a civil servant in Hesse who was vocal in welcoming thousands of mostly Muslim refugees to his state, was sitting on the front porch of his village home when a 45-year-old father of two with longstanding connections to neo-Nazi groups walked up to him at close range and shot him in the head.

    See, politics doesn’t stop just because you disenfranchise people. The alternative to peaceful democratic change is voters using your skull as a ballot box.

    The unnerving reality was that the deep social trust which has underpinned German society and kept it out of trouble for three generations was breaking down

    I don’t think there’s a single Western European country that could still be honestly described as a high trust society. That went out with mass immigration.

    The big debate today is not about cutting red tape or raising the status of entrepreneurs, but of transitioning to a four-day work week.

    Childless Europe is still caught in a fantasy of living the high life without doing any of the things that would be required to live the high life (increased productivity, lower costs, more European babies instead of dinghy retards, etc.)

    We see that in Britain with the electorate prepared to give Labour another go. Why not? Nobody believes politics will solve any of our problems anymore.

  7. BiND,

    That’s a fascinating long read. Thanks.

    I’ve held a view for a while that there’s a certain sort of internationalist boomer perspective across the world that is rooted in post-war thinking, post-civil rights thinking. And that many young people have been born and raised long after that and no longer feel the same things.

    Like I’m born after the boomers, but I felt the sense of WW2 strongly as a boy. Commando comics, older teachers who fought in the war, huge parades, lots of war films on TV. And you can see why people were drawn to the idea of the United Nations and the EEC as a reaction to that. I once read something about how European post-war modern architecture rejected classical architecture as it was seen to be related to Nazism.

    People born long after don’t have the same baggage, don’t have the same perspectives. Like the young black people today don’t suffer from the same problems of black people in the 60s or even the 80s. Look at our culture and how much people accept black superheroes.

  8. BTW Grist

    Nun bin ich auch rechtsextrem ?

    Rechtsradikal is a good synonym. Fernrechts, is not often heard.

  9. The Meissen Bison

    Ottokring: «The nutter vote will now be split between the AfD and BSW»

    On current polling that’s an awful lot of nutters.

    Grist: «Gott in Himmel! »

    If we’re honest, that was in the same module as “Hände Hoch!”, “Schweinhund!” and “For you the war is over, Engländer pig”.

  10. TMB

    Sorry I meant people voting for nutters. Both parties are full of looney tunes.

    Which is good, by the way.

    Anyway I am still waiting for the one on one smackdown between Alice Weidel and Sahra Wagenknecht.

  11. @Steve – “The alternative to peaceful democratic change is voters using your skull as a ballot box/”

    Usually it’s not an alternative but in addition. There’s no shortage of people who, finding their opinion is shared by a minority in society, will resort to violence to get their way.

  12. Charles – Usually it’s not an alternative but in addition. There’s no shortage of people who, finding their opinion is shared by a minority in society, will resort to violence to get their way.

    Surely you know that to be untrue.

    Historically, i.e. within our lifetimes, political violence was rare and shocking like IRA bombings.

    Now, MP’s need private security guards to protect them from eager members of the Peaceful Religion.

    And if it feels like people in general are angrier at politicians than they used to be, well, they are. But no, we used to live in high trust Western societies where MPs felt safe meeting constituents and Downing Street wasn’t blocked off from the public, and Winston Churchill’s statue was safe in London, not that long ago.

    It’s like a lot of subtle changes. Remember when Christmas markets didn’t need concrete barriers? Remember when you could take a bottle of whisky on a plane?

    The rapid demographic replacement of Europeans, and its consequences, are so mind-bogglingly awful for Euro-peasants, already reeling from the lockdown economy and the Net Zero insanity starting to take away their basic creature comforts, that’s it’s surprising they’ve been so incredibly restrained, so far.

    I think this is linked to the internet virtually replacing real society, somehow, but I have no proof as yet.

  13. “I think this is linked to the internet virtually replacing real society, somehow, but I have no proof as yet.”

    It is the place to where many retreat and hide from reality.

    We are the idiots. We pay attention, we ask questions. That is why we are angry.

    Like Orwell’s Proles we should be kept happy with beer, football and porn.

    Problem is : beer is £5 a pint, football is dominated by knee taking twats and… well porn seems to consist entirely of “stepmoms” or fat birds with tattoos.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *