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Hmm, well

The number of households in the UK that have never worked has hit a 12-year high as the labour crisis gripping Britain’s economy deepens, official data shows.

In the first three months of this year there were 269,000 non-student households where no adult had ever been employed, the highest since spring 2012 – the aftermath of the global financial crisis.

It also represents a 12pc jump compared with the same period a year earlier, the Office for National Statistics (ONS) said.

1% of households isn’t, in fact, a lot. I’m surprised it’s so low in fact.

Between January and March, there were 4.3 million 16 to 64-year-olds living in households where no adult was employed.

Ah, that’s more like the number we probably think it is. “Ever” is doing some work there in that first one. And 20% of households (near, at least) is quite a lot.

16 thoughts on “Hmm, well”

  1. That’s not 8.4m households, it’s 8.4m people in those households. So it’s probably not 20%.

    But even so, yes, 4.3 million working-age people living in households where no adult is working is still a hell of a lot.

  2. Peter MacFarlane

    Maybe if umpty-million people are choosing to live on benefits, just maybe those benefits are a tad too generous?

    It’s just a thought.

  3. Bloke in North Dorset

    Between January and March, there were 4.3 million 16 to 64-year-olds living in households where no adult was employed.

    As baby boomers move towards and in to retirement I wonder what percentage of 4.3m are like us? I stopped work when I was 59 so there was 5 years where we met that criteria through choice and had no intention of working. I know of quite a lot of my peers who didn’t wait until 65 or later to stope working.

  4. Tim, but it’s not 4.3m households, it’s “4.3 million 16 to 64-year-olds living in households”. Which is some number less than 4.3 million households, depending on the average number of 16-64 year olds living in those households.

    Still a hell of a lot, but it’s not 4.3m households so won’t approximate to 20%, unless nearly all of them are single-adult households.

  5. Many of those “18 to 64” will be just-out-of-education adults who aren’t working because they’ve not yet entered the job market. Many will be women who, yes it happens, don’t work and live off hubby’s money. And quite a few will be part of the absolute normal basic employment pattern of one job ending and the next job not yet starting, like me. Plus the early retirees like my Dad, like my ex-wife, like Bloke, like loads more.

  6. jgh said:
    “Many of those “18 to 64” will be just-out-of-education adults who aren’t working because they’ve not yet entered the job market. Many will be women who, yes it happens, don’t work and live off hubby’s money.”

    These are households where no-one works, not just individuals who don’t work:
    – Your “just-out-of-education adults” will mostly still be at home, so whether they’re included will depend on whether their parents work.
    – your ladies who lunch, “living off hubby’s money“ won’t be included, because hubby’s working.
    – you’ve a point on the pre-65 early retirees; be interesting to know how many of them there are.

  7. Other than statistical nerdism, why the hell is it anybody’s business whether I or anybody else is working?

  8. jgh / RichardT
    In their first statistic (households where no one had ever worked) theyonly reported on ‘non-student’ households, so perhaps they made that same adjustment when reporting on households with non one currently working – can’t tell from the snippet, and can’t be arsed to read the whole thing.

  9. OT: I see Reform have come up with an interesting plan to stop the constant desire of Big Business to import cheap labour – higher employers NI contributions on non-Uk citizens. Whats the TW view on that? Workable? My quibble would be that it won’t allow the employers to offer higher wages to UK citizens, which they could do – if they can afford to pay the extra for a non-UK citizen they should also be able to offer a UK citizen a higher wage and pay a lower NI contribution. But one assume equality law would prevent offering differential wages to foreigners. So this policy is one edged – it makes foreign workers more expensive to hire, but it doesn’t increase wages to help entice UK lard arses off their sofas.

  10. I rather liked the idea of a higher minimum wage for foreigners. Then watch the
    Left trying to argue that this harms immigrants, without admitting that higher minimum wages are harmful to low earners.

  11. Jim: Equality law doesn’t stop universities charging higher fees to foreigners, and it’s a standard demand of the Left that foreigners should pay higher taxes.

  12. “Equality law doesn’t stop universities charging higher fees to foreigners, and it’s a standard demand of the Left that foreigners should pay higher taxes.”

    Well it would be interesting to see what would happen. Obviously the foreigners who pay extra to come to UK universities are not UK resident, at least not when they start, so whether that makes a difference I have no idea. And universities may have carved out a special exemption or something, they are part of the State Blob, so it wouldn’t surprise me if they had. And of course taxes are the life blood of the State Blob, so I’m sure they have made it legal for them to charge what they like to whoever.

    But I’d be prepared to bet that if an Evil Capitalist™ like Tesco suddenly started offering higher wages to UK citizens over non-UK citizens the courts would very soon be involved. And that they’d be told very quickly to cut it out, and fined heavily for even thinking of trying.

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