Australian now banned in US academia

The latest target is the happy-go-lucky phrase “no worries”, which has been banned by a leading American university. In the excruciatingly literal world of the woke, saying “no worries” is regarded as – wait for it, no word of a lie – an insensitive negation of the listener’s feelings.

25 thoughts on “Australian now banned in US academia”

  1. “In the excruciatingly literal world of the woke, saying “no worries” is regarded as – wait for it, no word of a lie – an insensitive negation of the listener’s feelings.”

    Well… It can mean “I hear you, and I don’t give a fuck..” given the …flexibility.. the Ozzies apply to the phrase.
    So the Woke do have a point in the possibility of it being “an insensitive negation of the listener’s feelings” in certain circumstances. It is, to their detriment, unfortunate that their pained expression of those feelings falls in the exact use-case for this particular meaning of the phrase in australian culture.
    They should be happy the Ozzies don’t add the customarily unspoken “Ya whinin’cunt.” to that one, and at least try to adapt to US sensitivities to listening at all.

  2. Does this banning of an amusing Australian term, give everyone the right to beat to death any American who says, “Have a nice day”? Asking for a friend.

  3. It’s clearly the Telegraph being the Snowflakes here (although, to be fair, being a big bikr-riding, cross-dressing, avocado-scoffing commie, I of course don’t subscribe, so he might have reigned it back later in the article).

    https://www.lssu.edu/traditions/banishedwords/#toggle-id-2

    Take something from a Uni’s annual (since 1976, no less), “mock-serious”, “tongue-in-cheek” New Year publication and present it as “the woke” “banning” it. It’s like the perennial reports of Christmas being banned: pathetic. (Well, pre-Covid they were, anyway.)

    There’s enough stuff around free speech that is genuinely troubling (JK Rowling getting shit-listed, etc) but commentators like this seem to feel the need to stoke the fires of division (yeah, OK, sell firewall subs) by clearly, knowingly, misrepresenting an absolute nothing like this.

    Surprisingly, the Daily Mail’s take is a bit more balanced (than at least the first paragraph of the TG’s), and doesn’t even seem to feature the “w” word, although they do wheel out a couple of “experts” who completely miss the point by saying that the complainers are misinterpreting the original Aussie meaning of the phrase … whereas the whole point of the complaint (to the extent there is one that’s any more than “mock-serious”) is it being over/mis-used, i.e. not in that original sense. Oh well.

    Maybe I’m just biased towards the LSSU list becauae my daughter says “Wait! What?” about 20 times a day, it’s annoying as hell, and the Woke Brigade won’t let me beat it out of her!

  4. People who literally have no worries are the problem. If they had actual real things to worry about then they wouldn’t be fretting about things as trivial as this.

  5. @stonyground, displacement activity, probably. I’m only engaging in pointless below-the-line banter in the Gammonverse to put off doing 2022 budgets, for example…

    (To enable my procrastination further, does anyone know how to do quotes and links in these comments, btw?)

  6. Quotes : <blockquote>stuffgoeshere<blockquote>
    So you get this:

    stuffgoeshere

    Links: <a href=”URL goes here”>link text you want goes here</a>

    So this blog’s URL, presented as “here be Dragons” would become:
    <a href=”https://timworstall.com”>here be Dragons</a> and thus here be Dragons.

    Enjoy your procrastination, I enjoyed mine typing all this.. 😉

  7. “Why should one ever have to acknowledge another’s feelings?”

    Because for some of us, empathy is more than just a labelled walkway.

  8. I’m an American, and we literally say “no worries” all the fucking time. Especially in the corporate world and when being overly polite to attractive women.

  9. Suppose the “ban” were real.

    Then who do I ask to determine what phrase I should use?

    Ah. Don’t bother. No worries.

  10. “Why should one ever have to acknowledge another’s feelings?”

    Because for some of us, empathy is more than just a labelled walkway.

    Maybe the original question should be read as, “Why should one ever be forced to have to acknowledge another’s feelings?”

  11. In non-friend situations you can:

    Worry about others’ feelings all the time. You will be unsuccessful, because you don’t know their circumstances,and it’s exhausting,

    or,

    Just be polite using genetic phrases with no meaning other than “I’m being polite”.

    The endless “keep safe” that we get now — and intended to mean that — are meant to be polite. I find them excruciating. I don’t want to be safe. I’m happy taking risks.

    Use something safe, like “no worries,” Overuse is an important part of it not meaning its literal worss.

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